Articles | Volume 10, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-10-581-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-10-581-2022
Research article
 | 
10 Jun 2022
Research article |  | 10 Jun 2022

An experimental study of drainage network development by surface and subsurface flow in low-gradient landscapes

Brian G. Sockness and Karen B. Gran

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Latest update: 17 Apr 2024
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Short summary
To study channel network development following continental glaciation, we ran small physical experiments where networks slowly expanded into flat surfaces. By changing substrate and rainfall, we altered flow pathways between surface and subsurface. Initially, most channels grew by overland flow. As relief increased, erosion through groundwater sapping occurred, especially in runs with high infiltration and low cohesion, highlighting the importance of groundwater in channel network evolution.