Articles | Volume 4, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-4-799-2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-4-799-2016
Research article
 | 
31 Oct 2016
Research article |  | 31 Oct 2016

Catchment power and the joint distribution of elevation and travel distance to the outlet

Leonard S. Sklar, Clifford S. Riebe, Claire E. Lukens, and Dino Bellugi

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Short summary
To better understand how rainfall, erosion, and other landscape processes create patterns of outflow from catchments, we developed a new way of measuring how the land surface is organized. Each hillslope area, where water and sediment are sourced, has an elevation above the catchment outlet and a horizontal distance that materials must travel to reach the outlet. We combined these attributes in a new metric that captures how the production and loss of energy varies within and between catchments.