Articles | Volume 7, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-67-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-67-2019
Short communication
 | 
17 Jan 2019
Short communication |  | 17 Jan 2019

Short communication: flow as distributed lines within the landscape

John J. Armitage

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Latest update: 17 Apr 2024
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Short summary
Landscape evolution models (LEMs) aim to capture an aggregation of the processes of erosion and deposition and predict evolving topography. A key aspect of any LEM is how water is chosen to be routed down the surface, which can impact the model results and, importantly, the numerical accuracy. I find that by treating flow as lines within the model domain and by distributing water down all slopes, the results are independent of resolution, pointing to a new method to model landscape evolution.