Articles | Volume 8, issue 4
Earth Surf. Dynam., 8, 869–891, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-8-869-2020
Earth Surf. Dynam., 8, 869–891, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-8-869-2020

Research article 23 Oct 2020

Research article | 23 Oct 2020

Ice sheet and palaeoclimate controls on drainage network evolution: an example from Dogger Bank, North Sea

Andy R. Emery et al.

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AR by Andy Emery on behalf of the Authors (26 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Sep 2020) by Susan Conway
ED: Publish as is (15 Sep 2020) by Andreas Lang(Editor)
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Short summary
During the last ice age, sea level was lower, and the North Sea was land. The margin of a large ice sheet was at Dogger Bank in the North Sea. This ice sheet formed large rivers. After the ice sheet retreated down from the high point of Dogger Bank, the rivers had no water supply and dried out. Increased precipitation during the 15 000 years of land exposure at Dogger Bank formed a new drainage network. This study shows how glaciation and climate changes can control how drainage networks evolve.