Articles | Volume 5, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-479-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-479-2017
Research article
 | 
24 Aug 2017
Research article |  | 24 Aug 2017

Quantifying the controls on potential soil production rates: a case study of the San Gabriel Mountains, California

Jon D. Pelletier

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Short summary
The rate at which bedrock can be converted into transportable material is a fundamental control on the topographic evolution of mountain ranges. Using the San Gabriel Mountains, California, as an example, in this paper I demonstrate that this rate depends on topographic slope in mountain ranges with large compressive stresses via the influence of topographically induced stresses on fractures. Bedrock and climate both control this rate, but topography influences bedrock in an interesting new way.