Articles | Volume 5, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-757-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-757-2017
Research article
 | 
29 Nov 2017
Research article |  | 29 Nov 2017

Spatiotemporal patterns, triggers and anatomies of seismically detected rockfalls

Michael Dietze, Jens M. Turowski, Kristen L. Cook, and Niels Hovius

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Latest update: 29 May 2024
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Short summary
Rockfall is an essential geomorphic process and a hazard in steep landscapes which is hard to constrain with traditional approaches. Seismic methods allow for the detection, location, characterisation and linking of events to triggers by lag times. This new technique reveals 49 rockfalls in 6 months with seasonally varying locations. Freeze–thaw action accounts for only 5 events, whereas 19 rockfalls were caused by rain with a 1 h peak lag time, and 17 events were due to diurnal thermal forcing.