Articles | Volume 5, issue 4
Earth Surf. Dynam., 5, 757–779, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-757-2017

Special issue: From process to signal – advancing environmental...

Earth Surf. Dynam., 5, 757–779, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-757-2017

Research article 29 Nov 2017

Research article | 29 Nov 2017

Spatiotemporal patterns, triggers and anatomies of seismically detected rockfalls

Michael Dietze et al.

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Michael Dietze on behalf of the Authors (04 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (25 Sep 2017) by Simon Mudd
AR by Michael Dietze on behalf of the Authors (29 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Oct 2017) by Simon Mudd
ED: Publish as is (16 Oct 2017) by Frédéric Herman(Editor)
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Short summary
Rockfall is an essential geomorphic process and a hazard in steep landscapes which is hard to constrain with traditional approaches. Seismic methods allow for the detection, location, characterisation and linking of events to triggers by lag times. This new technique reveals 49 rockfalls in 6 months with seasonally varying locations. Freeze–thaw action accounts for only 5 events, whereas 19 rockfalls were caused by rain with a 1 h peak lag time, and 17 events were due to diurnal thermal forcing.