Articles | Volume 5, issue 1
Earth Surf. Dynam., 5, 85–100, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-85-2017
Earth Surf. Dynam., 5, 85–100, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-5-85-2017

Research article 30 Jan 2017

Research article | 30 Jan 2017

Steady state, erosional continuity, and the topography of landscapes developed in layered rocks

Matija Perne et al.

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AR by Matthew Covington on behalf of the Authors (31 Oct 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by Editor) (07 Dec 2016) by Greg Hancock
AR by Matthew Covington on behalf of the Authors (20 Dec 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 Dec 2016) by Greg Hancock
ED: Publish as is (05 Jan 2017) by Douglas Jerolmack(Editor)
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Short summary
Concepts of landscape equilibrium often enable the interpretation of landscape response to various forces. However, we demonstrate that standard conceptions of landscape equilibrium do not apply in layered rocks. We develop a more general mathematical description of steady state based on a constraint of land surface continuity. In the case of rock layers that are nearly horizontal, this continuity steady state makes substantially different predictions about the nature of equilibrium landscapes.