Articles | Volume 9, issue 5
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1323–1334, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1323-2021
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1323–1334, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1323-2021

Research article 30 Sep 2021

Research article | 30 Sep 2021

Sand mining far outpaces natural supply in a large alluvial river

Christopher R. Hackney et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on esurf-2021-39', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Jun 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on esurf-2021-39', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 Jun 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on esurf-2021-39 - response to reviews', Christopher Hackney, 28 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Christopher Hackney on behalf of the Authors (28 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Aug 2021) by Robert Hilton
AR by Christopher Hackney on behalf of the Authors (12 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Aug 2021) by Robert Hilton
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (30 Aug 2021) by A. Joshua West(Editor)
AR by Christopher Hackney on behalf of the Authors (09 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Unsustainable sand mining poses a threat to the stability of river channels. We use satellite imagery to estimate volumes of material removed from the Mekong River, Cambodia, over the period 2016–2020. We demonstrate that current rates of extraction now exceed previous estimates for the entire Mekong Basin and significantly exceed the volume of sand naturally transported by the river. Our work highlights the importance of satellite imagery in monitoring sand mining activity over large areas.