Articles | Volume 9, issue 5
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1363–1380, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1363-2021
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1363–1380, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1363-2021

Research article 14 Oct 2021

Research article | 14 Oct 2021

Relationship between meteoric 10Be and NO3 concentrations in soils along Shackleton Glacier, Antarctica

Melisa A. Diaz et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Katja Gänger on behalf of the Authors (26 Nov 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Dec 2020) by Arjen Stroeven
RR by Brent Goehring (10 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (20 Jan 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (31 Jan 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
AR by Melisa Diaz on behalf of the Authors (11 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Sep 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
AR by Melisa Diaz on behalf of the Authors (06 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (23 Sep 2021) by Arjen Stroeven
ED: Publish as is (23 Sep 2021) by Niels Hovius(Editor)
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Short summary
We collected soil surface samples and depth profiles every 5 cm (up to 30 cm) from 11 ice-free areas along the Shackleton Glacier, a major outlet glacier of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), and measured meteoric beryllium-10 and nitrate concentrations to understand the relationship between salts and beryllium-10. This relationship can help inform wetting history, landscape disturbance, and exposure duration.