Articles | Volume 9, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-167-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-167-2021
Research article
 | 
09 Mar 2021
Research article |  | 09 Mar 2021

Growing topography due to contrasting rock types in a tectonically dead landscape

Daniel Peifer, Cristina Persano, Martin D. Hurst, Paul Bishop, and Derek Fabel

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Latest update: 14 Jun 2024
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Short summary
Plate tectonics drive the formation of mountain ranges. Yet when tectonic forces cease, mountain ranges persist for hundreds of millions of years, forming major Earth surface features. This work presents denudation rate estimates from one such ancient mountain range that show that denudation is strongly tied to rock type. Resistant rocks denude more slowly despite having much steeper topography, and contrasts in rock type cause increasing relief in the absence of active tectonics.