Articles | Volume 7, issue 2
Earth Surf. Dynam., 7, 475–489, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-475-2019
Earth Surf. Dynam., 7, 475–489, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-475-2019

Research article 29 May 2019

Research article | 29 May 2019

Determining the optimal grid resolution for topographic analysis on an airborne lidar dataset

Taylor Smith et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Taylor Smith on behalf of the Authors (26 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Feb 2019) by Giulia Sofia
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Mar 2019)
RR by Marco Cavalli (05 Mar 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (17 Mar 2019)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (20 Mar 2019) by Giulia Sofia
AR by Taylor Smith on behalf of the Authors (25 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Apr 2019) by Giulia Sofia
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (08 May 2019)
ED: Publish as is (09 May 2019) by Giulia Sofia
ED: Publish as is (14 May 2019) by Tom Coulthard(Editor)
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Short summary
Representing the surface of the Earth on an equally spaced grid leads to errors and uncertainties in derived slope and aspect. Using synthetic data, we develop a quality metric that can be used to compare the uncertainties in different datasets. We then apply this method to a real-world lidar dataset, and find that 1 m data have larger error bounds than lower-resolution data. The highest data resolution is not always the best choice – it is important to consider the quality of the data.