Articles | Volume 8, issue 1
Earth Surf. Dynam., 8, 51–67, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-8-51-2020
Earth Surf. Dynam., 8, 51–67, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-8-51-2020

Research article 28 Jan 2020

Research article | 28 Jan 2020

Stabilising large grains in self-forming steep channels

William H. Booker and Brett C. Eaton

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by William Booker on behalf of the Authors (03 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Sep 2019) by Jens Turowski
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Sep 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (06 Nov 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (14 Nov 2019) by Jens Turowski
AR by William Booker on behalf of the Authors (23 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (25 Nov 2019) by Jens Turowski
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (28 Nov 2019) by Tom Coulthard(Editor)
AR by William Booker on behalf of the Authors (03 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Using experiments, we found that the form and behaviour of a river depends on its ability to move the larger of its constituents. The manner in which all particles move depends upon the rate and calibre of the supplied material, as well as the rate of supplied water. This goes against the prevailing theory of a single important and representative grain size under depositing conditions, and these results may alter how we interpret river deposits to explain their formation.