Articles | Volume 9, issue 1
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1–18, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1-2021
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1–18, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1-2021

Research article 08 Jan 2021

Research article | 08 Jan 2021

Groundwater erosion of coastal gullies along the Canterbury coast (New Zealand): a rapid and episodic process controlled by rainfall intensity and substrate variability

Aaron Micallef et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Aaron Micallef on behalf of the Authors (07 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Aug 2020) by Claire Masteller
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Sep 2020) by Claire Masteller
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Sep 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Oct 2020) by Claire Masteller
AR by Aaron Micallef on behalf of the Authors (25 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (11 Nov 2020) by Claire Masteller
ED: Publish as is (12 Nov 2020) by Niels Hovius(Editor)
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Short summary
We study coastal gullies along the Canterbury coast of New Zealand using field observations, sample analyses, drones, satellites, geophysical instruments and modelling. We show that these coastal gullies form when rainfall intensity is higher than 40 mm per day. The coastal gullies are formed by landslides where buried channels or sand lenses are located. This information allows us to predict where coastal gullies may form in the future.