Articles | Volume 9, issue 3
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 505–517, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-505-2021
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 505–517, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-505-2021

Research article 07 Jun 2021

Research article | 07 Jun 2021

Locating rock slope failures along highways and understanding their physical processes using seismic signals

Jui-Ming Chang et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jui-Ming Chang on behalf of the Authors (09 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (25 Feb 2021) by Claire Masteller
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (02 Mar 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Apr 2021) by Claire Masteller
AR by Jui-Ming Chang on behalf of the Authors (14 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (30 Apr 2021) by Claire Masteller
ED: Publish as is (03 May 2021) by Niels Hovius(Editor)
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Short summary
Seismic techniques applied in rock slope failure research do not provide rapid notifications, as for earthquakes, due to the lack of connections between seismic signals and events. We studied 10 known events in Taiwan and developed a GeoLoc scheme to locate rock slope failures, estimate the event volume, and understand their physical process using available videos. With real-time seismic data transmission, a rapid report can be created for the public within several minutes of the event.