Articles | Volume 9, issue 5
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1279–1300, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1279-2021
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 1279–1300, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-1279-2021

Research article 20 Sep 2021

Research article | 20 Sep 2021

Hilltop curvature as a proxy for erosion rate: wavelets enable rapid computation and reveal systematic underestimation

William T. Struble and Joshua J. Roering

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on esurf-2021-40', Tyler Doane, 14 Jun 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on esurf-2021-40', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 Jun 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on esurf-2021-40 - Response to Reviewers', William Struble, 07 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by William Struble on behalf of the Authors (07 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Aug 2021) by Simon Mudd
RR by Tyler Doane (11 Aug 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Aug 2021) by Simon Mudd
AR by William Struble on behalf of the Authors (16 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Aug 2021) by Simon Mudd
ED: Publish as is (17 Aug 2021) by Tom Coulthard(Editor)
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Short summary
We used a mathematical technique known as a wavelet transform to calculate the curvature of hilltops in western Oregon, which we used to estimate erosion rate. We find that this technique operates over 1000 times faster than other techniques and produces accurate erosion rates. We additionally built artificial hillslopes to test the accuracy of curvature measurement methods. We find that at fast erosion rates, curvature is underestimated, raising questions of measurement accuracy elsewhere.