Articles | Volume 4, issue 1
Earth Surf. Dynam., 4, 159–174, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-4-159-2016
Earth Surf. Dynam., 4, 159–174, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-4-159-2016

Research article 02 Feb 2016

Research article | 02 Feb 2016

Basal shear stress under alpine glaciers: insights from experiments using the iSOSIA and Elmer/Ice models

C. F. Brædstrup et al.

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Cited articles

Adhikari, S., and Marshall, S. J.: Influence of high-order mechanics on simulation of glacier response to climate change: insights from Haig Glacier, Canadian Rocky Mountains, The Cryosphere, 7, 1527–1541, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-7-1527-2013, 2013.
Ahlkrona, J., Kirchner, N., and Lötstedt, P.: Accuracy of the zeroth- and second-order shallow ice approximation – numerical and theoretical results, Geosci. Model Dev., 6, 2135–2152, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-6-2135-2013, 2013.
Anderson, R. S., Molnar, P., and Kessler, M. A.: Features of glacial valley profiles simply explained, J. Geophys. Res.-Earth, 111, F01004, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005JF000344, 2006.
Baral, D. R., Hutter, K., and Greve, R.: Asymptotic theories of large-scale motion, temperature, and moisture distribution in land-based polythermal ice sheets: a critical review and new developments, Appl. Mech. Rev., 54, 215–256, 2001.
Beaud, F., Flowers, G. E., and Pimentel, S.: Seasonal-scale abrasion and quarrying patterns from a two-dimensional ice-flow model coupled to distributed and channelized subglacial drainage, Geomorphology, 219, 176–191, 2014.
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Short summary
When studying long-term glacial landscape evolution one must make simplifying assumptions about the nature of glacial flow. In this study we show that for two different numerical models such simplifications are mostly unimportant in the setting of glacial landscape evolution. Following this we find that glacial erosion is most intense in the early stages of glaciation and its effects are reduced with time due to flow patterns in the ice removing areas of highest resistance to flow.