Articles | Volume 9, issue 4
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 687–700, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-687-2021
Earth Surf. Dynam., 9, 687–700, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-9-687-2021

Research article 07 Jul 2021

Research article | 07 Jul 2021

The rate and extent of wind-gap migration regulated by tributary confluences and avulsions

Eitan Shelef and Liran Goren

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Cited articles

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Beeson, H. W., McCoy, S. W., and Keen-Zebert, A.: Geometric disequilibrium of river basins produces long-lived transient landscapes, Earth Planet. Sc. Lett., 475, 34–43, 2017. a, b
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Braun, J.: A review of numerical modeling studies of passive margin escarpments leading to a new analytical expression for the rate of escarpment migration velocity, Gondwana Res., 53, 209–224, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gr.2017.04.012, 2017. a, b, c
Brocard, G., Teyssier, C., Dunlap, W. J., Authemayou, C., Simon-Labric, T., Cacao-Chiquín, E. N., Gutiérrez-Orrego, A., and Morán-Ical, S.: Reorganization of a deeply incised drainage: role of deformation, sedimentation and groundwater flow, Basin Res., 23, 631–651, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2117.2011.00510.x, 2011. a, b
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Drainage basins are bounded by water divides (divides) that define their shape and extent. Divides commonly coincide with high ridges, but in places that experienced extensive tectonic deformation, divides sometimes cross elongated valleys. Inspired by field observations and using simulations of landscape evolution, we study how side channels that drain to elongated valleys induce pulses of divide migration, affecting the distribution of water and erosion products across mountain ranges.