Articles | Volume 7, issue 1
Earth Surf. Dynam., 7, 77–86, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-77-2019
Earth Surf. Dynam., 7, 77–86, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/esurf-7-77-2019

Research article 18 Jan 2019

Research article | 18 Jan 2019

Environmental signal shredding on sandy coastlines

Eli D. Lazarus et al.

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Cited articles

Anderson, T. R., Frazer L. N., and Fletcher C. H.: Transient and persistent shoreline change from a storm, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L08401, https://doi.org/10.1029/2009GL042252, 2010. 
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Birkemeier, W. A.: The effects of the 19 December 1977 coastal storm on beaches in North Carolina and New Jersey, USACE Coastal Engineering Research Center, Duck, North Carolina, USA, 1979. 
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Short summary
A single storm event can change the shape of a sandy beach dramatically, but beaches also exhibit a remarkable ability to recover. So how important are storm-driven changes to a beach in the long term? This question affects predictions of future shoreline change. Here we explore signal shredding – when sediment transport erases any signature of outside driving forces. Our results suggest that major storm impacts may tell us little about long-term shoreline change and vice versa.